Learning — creative technology and education 

At Southbank Centre I directed a digital education programme including workshops, maker labs and hack days. These were designed to introduce our audience to creative technology and raise issues about how the web and connected society is profoundly changing our world.

Online learning content engaged new audiences in great works of the artistic canon such as Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle or Benjamin Britten's War Requiem.

An animated guide to The Ring

An animated short, that briefly introduces the key characters, narrative elements and leitmotifs of Wagner's masterpiece. Part of Opera North's Ring Cycle at Southbank Centre.
YouTube:  An Animated Guide To The Ring  

 
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Iconic machines

The Centre for Computing History brought a suite of BBC Microcomputers and iconic video game consoles to the Web We Want festival. Young people learned computer programming on the 30-year-old BBC BASIC and saw the NeXT cube computer, the same model that Sir Tim Berners-Lee used to invent the World Wide Web in 1989.

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Creative technology

During the Web We Want festival, interdisciplinary artist Evan Ifekoya invited participants to write lyrics and create music. Together they investigated the politics, identity and new behaviours of the Web, via a collaborative song-writing lab.

 
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Hacking and making

Southbank Centre invited Technology Will Save Us to create a digital space together invented by children for children at the Imagine Festival. The workshops introduced children to interactive technologies, in a playful and creative way. The class then invented a Time Machine which was fabricated as a working installation.

Uncovering Classics

A project aimed at demystifying great works of art, this project won the Royal Philharmonic Society Award for Learning and Participation for it's ambitious education programme which explored Benjamin Britten's masterpiece.

 

Learning and participation

Privacy campaigner Adam Harvey ran CV Dazzle workshops. Explaining the algorithms that make up different face recognition systems in popular software he demonstrated how to change your appearance to confuse facial recognition and surveillance systems.